AIMCAL WCHC / SPE FlexPackCon 2015 - Agenda

The Web Coating & Handling Conference/FlexPackCon program is divided into four session tracks: Web Coating & Laminating, Vacuum Web Coating, Web Handling, and Flexible Packaging. Attendees may choose sessions from any track.

This is a preliminary agenda and is subject to change.

Sunday October 25, 2015

8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Registration Table

Location: Lobby

Tracks:

Vacuum Short Course

Web Handling Short Course

Web Slitting Short Course

SPE Short Course

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Dr. David Roisum, Finishing Technologies
Location: Acacia 1-3
Whether you make, convert or use webs; you must know web handling. Find out how to:

Eliminate wrinkles, baggy webs and apply effective spreading
Eliminate winding defects
Design and maintain web machinery, especially rollers
Design and maintain control systems for tension, nip, guiding and more
Design web products and processes for more reliable manufacturing
Troubleshoot a variety of web, web handling and converting issues
Understand why the web world does what it does
Bring your web handling problems to class, leave with solutions.Find out why more than 3,000 students have signed up for this premier instruction.

David Roisum of Finishing Technologies is a well-known authority in web handling and converting. He has authored eight books and more than 100 papers and articles such as his monthly Web Works column in Converting magazine. His background includes a variety of web manufacturing and converting experiences. At Beloit Corp. he was a machine designer and then research manager for winders. At the Web Handling Research Center he served as an advisor and helped set up their pilot lab. At Kimberly-Clark he worked as an internal converting consultant to all business units. Finally, as an independent consultant, he helps troubleshoot a variety of problems in the paper, film, foil, nonwoven and textile industries. He has visited nearly 1,000 plants in his more than 30 years of experience.
An accomplished professional speaker and instructor, he is noted for his skill in translating highly technical information into a common sense, practical reference. He has been honored several times with TAPPI's Finest Faculty Award based on the positive feedback from short course attendees. More than 5,000 students have attended his own courses including the ever-popular Web Handling and Converting.

Hung-Jue Sue, Polymer Technology Center
Location: Acacia 4-6
Significant research on scratch behavior of polymeric coatings and films has been carried out in recent years owing to the ever-increasing emphasis on aesthetics, structural integrity, and protective functionality of polymer surfaces for many engineering applications. Since scratch performance is now recognized as an important engineering property for polymers, the ability to establish quantitative correlation between material parameters and scratch resistance becomes highly desirable. A new test methodology based on materials science and mechanics tools for evaluating scratch resistance of polymers has recently been developed at our laboratory and became a new ASTM/ISO standard (D7027/ISO19252). This new test method allows for simple, unambiguous quantitative evaluation and ranking of scratch resistance of polymeric materials, coatings, and films. Finite element methods (FEM) simulation has also been performed to facilitate the correlation between material parameters and surface damage observed during the scratch process. The usefulness of the new ASTM/ISO methodology for fundamental understanding of scratch behavior of coatings and films will be presented. Approaches for development of scratch resistant polymeric coatings and films will also be discussed.
Characterization of tensile true stress-strain curves and fracture toughness of ductile polymeric thin films is nontrivial. It requires extreme care in sample preparation to avoid premature film damage, in fixture design to minimize out of plane film wrinkling, and in the analysis of their deformation and corresponding energy partitioning to establish meaningful structure-property relationship. In this presentation, the tensile true stress-strain curves of a series of m-LLDPE blown films (Exceed 1012, 1018, and 1023) were generated to allow for quantitative energy partitioning at each deformation zone in situ as defined by the essential work of fracture (EWF) approach. The EWF approach is found to be highly effective in differentiation of film performance of varying film densities and upon change in their processing conditions, i.e., blow-up ratio, film gage, orientation, and froze-line height. Furthermore, in situ and post-mortem plastic zone analysis of the EWF tested films using digital imaging correlation (DIC) enable our determination of partitioned EWF energy terms with corresponding size and shape of the plastic zone and for correlation with films’ structural parameters. Implication of the present study for design of high performance LLDPE films is discussed.

Characterization of tensile true stress-strain curves and fracture toughness of ductile polymeric thin films is nontrivial. It requires extreme care in sample preparation to avoid premature film damage, in fixture design to minimize out of plane film wrinkling, and in the analysis of their deformation and corresponding energy partitioning to establish meaningful structure-property relationship. In this presentation, the tensile true stress-strain curves of a series of m-LLDPE blown films (Exceed 1012, 1018, and 1023) were generated to allow for quantitative energy partitioning at each deformation zone in situ as defined by the essential work of fracture (EWF) approach. The EWF approach is found to be highly effective in differentiation of film performance of varying film densities and upon change in their processing conditions, i.e., blow-up ratio, film gage, orientation, and froze-line height. Furthermore, in situ and post-mortem plastic zone analysis of the EWF tested films using digital imaging correlation (DIC) enable our determination of partitioned EWF energy terms with corresponding size and shape of the plastic zone and for correlation with films’ structural parameters. Implication of the present study for design of high performance LLDPE films is discussed.

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Donald J. McClure, Acuity Consulting and Training
Location: Acacia 1-3
This short course focuses strongly on coatings made by resistance evaporation but also touches briefly on e-beam evaporation and sputter deposition. It is intended for roll coater machine operators, maintenance personnel, technicians, engineers, scientists, supervisors, and others who would benefit from an introduction to topics related to roll-to-roll vacuum coating onto polymer film substrates (often simply referred to as vacuum web coating). This course emphasizes practical aspects of the topics, and the treatment will be descriptive with little mathematics used.
Topical Outline:
Sources of information about vacuum web coating (where to find still more details)
Markets for vacuum web coated products (who’s making money and with what)
Vacuum technology issues related to web coating (how much vacuum do we need and why)
Substrates for vacuum web coating (how our coated products depend on our substrates)
Web handling and web winding systems (how to move the web without damage)
Web cooling issues (how to avoid heat distortion and wrinkles)
Deposition or coating processes (how to make the coatings we need):
resistance evaporation (by far the most widely used coating process)
e-beam evaporation (a high rate process for a broad range of materials)
sputter deposition (a slower but very versatile process)
Process and product monitoring methods (how to make consistently good product)

David Rumson, Slitting Educator/Consultant
Location: Acacia 4-6
Common Slitting Methods
Presented are an overview of web material characteristics and the dynamic challenges to consider when selecting a slitting method for your operation. Included are some less common but practical slitting methods for material specific web separation applications.
Featured are Razor, Crush and Shear Slitting web fracturing methods juxtaposed with magnified photographs of various web materials during Lab controlled slitting. Briefly discussed are the friction and force effects of both Crush and Shear Slitting and an overview of common knife shapes and their advantages .
Razor Slitting
Discussed are web Tensile Stress Fracturing and where razor slitting is best used. Presented are web deformation comparisons of shear and razor slitting effects on various polymer web materials with microscopic fotos.
Included is information on web deformation, blade wear and how High/Flared edges (a common nightmare for thin films processes) occur on finished roll goods.
In-air and wrapped web paths are covered along with blade oscillation. Additional discussion includes razor blade materials and common razor blade holders. A summary of razor slitting Benefits and Limitations finishes this segment.

Slitting Adhesive Webs
This presentation will compare the differences between the World of Adhesive Science and the World of Adhesive Web Manufacturing that some of you must work within. Presented are some of the pitfalls of both Pressure Sensitive Adhesive slitting and Heat Sensitive Adhesive Slitting.
Techniques to better deal with adhesive web slitting will include knife lubrication, heated and chilled knives, and non-stick surface coatings.
Trim and Bleed Slitting
Discussion includes common trim knife selection and arrangements for Razor, Crush and Shear slitting. Bleed trim slitting is presented for consideration to help minimize High Roll Edge profile when slitting at more than just edge trim locations.
A brief comparison of suction and winding trim removal systems is included with basic do’s and don’ts. Common trim removal problems are also presented.
Slitting Practical Matters
This final course section presents recommended policies and procedures to help gain better control of the slitting process. Also presented are various slitting defect causes with techniques and/or tools to mitigate impact on the production process.
Discussed are Slitting Dust; ways to quantify Shear Slitting set up; measuring the Shear Angle, setting Side Load Force, Overlap and Run-Out. Additional subjects include knife sharpness checks, knife holder integrity and knife care.

4:45 PM - 6:15 PM

Keynote and Welcome Reception Sponsored by Precision Die Systems

Location: Sunset Veranda
6:15 PM - 7:00 PM

Opening Keynote

Location: Vista Ballroom
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Opening Reception and TableTops Exhibition Sponsored by Nova Chemicals

Location: Royal Palm

Monday October 26, 2015

7:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast Sponsored by L & M Instruments LLC - Followed by talk with the Concierge for Guests and Spouses

Location: Royal Palm
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Registration Table

Location: Royal Palm Foyer

Tracks:

Vacuum Coating
Location: Orchid 1

Web Coating
Location: Orchid 2

Web Handling
Location: Acacia 1-3

FlexPackCon
Location: Orchid 3-4

Sessions:

Flexible Devices

Session Leaders: Andrew Jack, Vacuum Depositing Inc. and Joe Perdue, ECKART America

Advances in Coating Technology

Session Leaders: Dr. Greg Williams, Coveris Advanced Coatings and Dr. Mai Chen, DOW

Drives and Static Control

Session Leaders: Duane Smith, Davis Standard and Dave Rumson, Slitting Consultant/Educator

Sustainable Solutions

Session Leaders: Dr. Henk Blom, Rollprint Packaging Products
8:30 AM
Jens Degenhardt , Applied Materials WEB Coating GmbH
Roll-to-Roll production of flexible electronic devices (active matrix TFT backplanes, OLED frontplanes and touch screens) combine the advantages of the use of inexpensive, lightweight and flexible substrates with high throughput production to enable new form factor products with exceptional robustness and mechanical stability.  Although significant cost reduction can also be found in terms of processing tool capital cost, utilized substrate area and process gas flow when compared with batch processing systems.  Nevertheless, material handling, device patterning and yield issues have limited widespread utilization of R2R manufacturing within the electronics industry.  Recently, significant advances have been made in device patterning enabling mass production of a wide variety of flexible electronic devices.  These techniques are now so advanced that feature sizes of less than 40 nm can be produced on thin film layer stacks deposited on 50 um thick polymeric substrates and features less than 20 um on thick film processed screen printed metal layers for narrow bezel applications.  Significant challenges also exist in terms of the layer deposition technologies used in R2R manufacture of these devices, primarily based on defect mitigation and detection. The work presented in this paper therefore describes the principal equipment challenges based on moving from lab to fab scale manufacturing. Results will be presented outlining amorphous silicon and IGZO backplane performance, ITO based touch panel performance in addition to barrier performance for final device encapsulation. This paper also addresses areas where both thick and thin film processing (atmospheric & vacuum) technologies can be combined.
Mark Miller, Coating Tech Slot Dies
Previously, intermittent coating via slot die technology was presented and details regarding lithium-ion battery coating applications were provided. Fluid control and physical movement were investigated for the previous experiments. Utilization of both seemed to create the best effects for reduced head/tail development, reduced edge bead, and improved parallel edge effects. Surface modification and vacuum were not considered for this work. In this ever progressing field, developing a deeper understanding of raw material rheology and process limitations provide the framework for new developments and breakthroughs in the intermittent coating industries. Investigations into line speed limitations, die swell (liquid spread) and the effect of forces (gravity, pressure, viscosity and surface energy) were completed. Intermittent coating continues to be an important and growing area in the world of slot die coating technology in general, and the flexible electronics and energy storage industries in particular. Join us for a discussion on the art and science of patch coating.
Clarence Klassen, KlassENgineering Inc.
"Regulator tuning is required for several control loops in our industry such as temperature, gauge, pressure regulation and drives. For more than 20 years, drives have had auto-tuning available. We observe that in many cases auto-tuning is skipped. In other cases auto-tuning is performed with default parameters. In other cases auto-tuning fails.

The procedure for auto-tuning varies from drive vendor to vendor. Some auto-tuning requires distinctly manual interventions such as decoupling the motor from the load. We note that auto-tuning is not commonly available for tension and dancer regulators.

We will discuss the purpose of tuning, required tuning targets and special cases where auto-tuning procedures must be modified."
Dr. Terry Cooper, ARGO Group International
There has been an increasing transition from rigid to flexible plastic packaging, particularly multilayer barrier films and pouch packaging. Flexible packaging is more economically advantageous than other packaging formats because of its greatly reduced material and energy usage, manufacturing costs and transport costs. However, even though it generates drastically reduced packaging waste and life-cycle analyses show favorable sustainability characteristics versus rigid formats, flexible packaging is still encountering opposition on ecological grounds due to difficulties in end-of-life collecting, sorting and processing. Because of its multilayer construction, and often contamination with food wastes, it is not readily recyclable by mechanical methods so that it presently generally ends up in landfill. Consequently, adversarial campaigns have been instituted by environmental groups which are pressurizing food companies and their shareholders to set up take-back systems for such packaging or stop using it altogether. Against this, the food and recycling industries are developing new economic end-of-life recycling and recovery processes for multilayer flexible plastic packaging to keep it from landfill, and setting up take-back systems with organizations such as TerraCycle. Industry associations such as the Flexible Packaging Association are working to promote such systems and to educate consumers that mechanical recyclability and sustainability are not synonymous and that the sustainability and eco-friendliness of flexible packaging lie in its minimal materials and energy use and its waste reduction for the packaged products, particularly food waste. Recycling and recovery processes under development and in early stage deployment will be surveyed, including: economic methods to separate and recover the film layers, including when metal foil or paper is incorporated; waste-to-energy systems such as anaerobic or plasma pyrolysis; and pyrolytic waste-to-fuel and waste-to-petrochemicals operations.
9:00 AM
Jens Degenhardt, Applied Materials WEB Coating GmbH
Roll-to-Roll production of flexible electronic devices (active matrix TFT backplanes, OLED frontplanes and touch screens) combine the advantages of the use of inexpensive, lightweight and flexible substrates with high throughput production to enable new form factor products with exceptional robustness and mechanical stability.  Although significant cost reduction can also be found in terms of processing tool capital cost, utilized substrate area and process gas flow when compared with batch processing systems.  Nevertheless, material handling, device patterning and yield issues have limited widespread utilization of R2R manufacturing within the electronics industry.  Recently, significant advances have been made in device patterning enabling mass production of a wide variety of flexible electronic devices.  These techniques are now so advanced that feature sizes of less than 40 nm can be produced on thin film layer stacks deposited on 50 um thick polymeric substrates and features less than 20 um on thick film processed screen printed metal layers for narrow bezel applications.  Significant challenges also exist in terms of the layer deposition technologies used in R2R manufacture of these devices, primarily based on defect mitigation and detection. The work presented in this paper therefore describes the principal equipment challenges based on moving from lab to fab scale manufacturing. Results will be presented outlining amorphous silicon and IGZO backplane performance, ITO based touch panel performance in addition to barrier performance for final device encapsulation. This paper also addresses areas where both thick and thin film processing (atmospheric & vacuum) technologies can be combined.
Andrea Glawe, KROENERT GmbH & Co KG
Applications to define surfaces with special features are increasing. Encapsulation films for OPV and OLED, printing of thin film sensor for NFC technology but also anti reflective and and nano layers are samples. Precise coating layers have to be applied independent which product is in focus. The improvement of precise coating and printing methods as well as intermitted coating technologies is still in the focus of machinery supplier. KROENERT is investigating a lot in the development of new control systems for intermitted coating applications as well as in simultaneous, double-side intermitted coating processes and precise printing processes. The results of the research and development activities together with leading research institutes to improve the coating process as well as the coating line itself will be shown with the presentation.
William Gilbert, Siemens Industry, Inc.
Converting and web processing applications with low web speeds pose several drive system design and control challenges. The traditional solution has been to optimize each of the system’s drives with high ratio gearing between the motor and load. This practice allows for the smallest drive size but often at the expense of tension control performance. For example, the physical properties of low compliance webs such as metals or foils dictate that tension control is best achieved by regulating the torque of the driven motor. The substantial losses of high ratio gearing isolate the motor from the load and make torque regulated tension control difficult to implement. High ratio gearing can also cause tension accuracy issues from the amplified motor torque ripple, increased backlash and poor mechanical compliance introduced by the gearing. This paper examines the issues with high ratio geared drive systems and introduces a solution for improving tension control performance in low web velocity tension control applications.
Abdelhadi Sahnoune, ExxonMobil Chemical Company
"Flexible packaging represents one of the largest applications of plastics, and its role in addressing sustainability challenges is well recognized. However, with the heightened awareness about resources consumption and environmental concerns, plastic packaging products are often perceived by the public and decision-makers as having negative impacts on sustainability. This, in turn, has led industry, as well as waste management services, to explore the best options for managing flexible packaging at its end-of-life.

We will discuss, through the use of life cycle assessment (LCA), the potential impacts of the three main waste management options for flexible packaging – namely recycling, landfilling and waste-to-energy. Using several examples, we will show the relative contribution of the end-of-life phase to the full life cycle environmental impacts. We will also demonstrate that the best end-of-life options are often dependent on the environmental goals and geographic location. In addition, economic factors play an equally important role when considering different waste management options.
"
9:30 AM
Dr. Jae Heung Lee, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology
Coating Testbed was opened at Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology with support from the Ministry of Knowledge Economy in 2011. It is equipped with three types of roll-to-roll coaters at a pilot scale, ie, wet coater, sputter and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coater. In addition to pilot scale coaters, there are also lab-scale coaters, film testing apparatus, rheometers and permeability testers. We have worked to develop functional films with the desirable optical, electrical conducting and barrier properties for touch screen panels and displays with several companies. We will present the results on the functional films such as Ag nanowire coated films and barrier films converted by R2R wet coater and CVD, respectively, with focusing especially on the effects of types of materials and processing conditions. We obtained transparent conducting films with low surface resistivity of a few ?/? and high light transmittance using Ag nanowires, and films with high barrier properties to water vapor less than 10-3 g/day/m2 for a single layer coated film by R2R CVD.
Ron Fraley, Precision Die Systems Corp.
This paper will deal with the advantages and disadvantages of the two types of dies in different product segments and case studies for those markets.
Dr. Kelly Robinson, Electrostatic Answers
Static causes injury and waste. Controlling static in web conveyance lines is challenging because operations are complex and static problems are often intermittent. While in-house technical expertise on static control is essential, many resources are available including vendors and consultants. In this presentation, I suggest that we should rely on internal resources to maintain good static control and manage change. Draw on external resources when persistent static problems threaten product quality and manufacturing output.
Dr. Didem Öner-Deliormanli, The DOW Chemical Company
"Every year, millions of tons of post-industrial scrap are generated under normal production processes for making food & specialty packaging. Several potential solutions with different recycle streams will be illustrated in this talk.
For instance, we will discuss the challenges with recycling barrier film scrap. With its more complex composition and the presence of polar components, high melting barrier polymers cannot be easily recycled back into new film structures. Thus, this film scrap is currently being sold into low value uses, land-filled, or burnt to collect the energy value. Dow’s novel compatibilizer technology will enable film manufacturers to recycle post-industrial barrier film scrap containing EVOH and PA back into their original film production, resulting in a sustainable solution to an everyday challenge.

Traditional maleic anhydride (MAH) grafted polyolefins are known as compatibilizers or 'tie layers' between EVOH and/or polyamide with polyolefins in multilayer film structures where the MAH polyolefin forms a distinct layer between the EVOH and/or polyamide and a polyolefin layer. However, when reincorporating these multi-component films into a recycle blend, the interfacial surface area is higher and traditional MAH grafted polyolefins are unable to create small EVOH and/or polyamide domains resulting in poor film appearance. In contrast, the novel compatibilizer disclosed in this report is capable of minimizing the domain sizes resulting in significant processing and property improvements. By using the novel compatibilizer, films containing the recycle stream displayed the same optical and mechanical properties as those produced from virgin polymers only.

We will discuss the experience in using this compatibilizer, its impact on film performance and the limits associated with scrap incorporation.
"
10:00 AM

Break Sponsored by L & M Instruments LLC

Location: Royal Palm

Sessions:

Transparent Conductors

Session Leaders: Andrew Jack, Vacuum Depositing Inc. and Joe Perdue, ECKART America

Advances in Coating Technology (continued)

Session Leaders: Dr. Greg Williams, Coveris Advanced Coatings and Dr. Mai Chen, DOW

Rollers

Session Leaders: Ken Guhse, Honeywell and Dr. David Roisum, Finishing Technologies, Inc.

Sustainable Solutions (continued)

Session Leader: Dr. Henk Blom, Rollprint Packaging Products
10:30 AM
Scott J. Jones, 3M
The miniaturization of portable electronic devices, including convergence of functions, integration of packaging and pace of innovation demand reduction of weight and thickness of individual components, as well as performance advantages not previously seen.  Of particular interest are film-based transparent conductors with high transparency, neutral color, low electrical resistance and minimal visible contrast between patterned and unpatterned regions.  In this presentation we will discuss one approach to meeting these requirements for electronic device applications with 3M’s Advanced Conductor Technology.
Jang Hwan Lee, SAM
In the flexible or printed electronics market, the roll to roll process is key technology because of its ability for the mass production resulting in low cost. So the needs for more thin and uniform coating technology is increased for the flexible electronics likes OPV, OLED. Also the technology for the reliable coating process control and monitoring function is more needed. In this paper SPEL's developed slot die coating unit(SDC-series) will be introduced. The key process parameters in slot die coating are the coating gap, speed and flow rate. Also for the reliabel coating process, in-line thickness and meniscus should be monitored and those information be feedbacked to the ink flow rate controller. By using multiple vision cameras and precise linear stage units, SDC-series can achieve the reliabel unifrom coating film thickness control and in-line monitor. And those developed and fabricated systems are investigated with measuring surface resistance of coated PEDOT:PSS film.
Duane Smith, Davis-Standard LLC
Today’s web producing and converting lines must handle a wide variety of substrates requiring precise control of a wide range of web tensions at ever increasing processing speeds. The challenge of web handling is to convey these web materials straight through a process without distortion or web defects such as wrinkles. All web producing and converting lines require the use of idler rolls, pull rolls, spreaders and edge guides in order to provide control of a web as it is conveyed. Without the correct size and application of these devices, the web might not track properly, could wrinkle or become distorted, and web breaks could occur. This paper, Guidelines for Rolls Used in Web Handling provides general guidelines for selecting these items to assist in successfully meeting this web handling challenge .
Randy Jester, BASF
"ecovio is an engineered blend of ecoflex® an aliphatic polyester and PLA which solves many of the
processing and performance issues associated with PLA while maintaining the compostability required
to support sustainability in packaging. The resin is processable on typical equipment utilized in blown
and cast film industries as well as extrusion coating applications."
11:00 AM
Han-Ki Kim, Sung-Hyun Park, Sang-Jin-Lee & Dr. Jae Heung Lee, Kyung Hee University
Indium tin oxide (ITO), Ag, and ITO layers were sputtered onto a flexible PET substrate with a 700 mm width by using a commercial roll-to-roll (RTR) sputtering system to use as a flexible and transparent anode for flexible organic solar cells (FOSCs) and flexible transparent heaters (FTHs). To optimize the electrical and optical properties of the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer, the thickness of Ag layer were varied by controlling of the DC power applied on Ag targets during the RTR sputtering process. Compared to thickness control of the top and bottom ITO layer, the thickness control of the Ag layer is more effective to obtain a low sheet resistance and high transmittance ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer. At an optimized thickness of ITO (35 nm) and Ag (10 nm), a symmetric ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer showed a sheet resistance of 4.56O/square and a high optical transmittance of 87.2 %. Various bending test results showed that the high failure strain of the Ag inter layer led to good flexibility of the multilayer films. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of the Ag layer thickness on the performance of FOSCs and FTHs fabricated on RTR sputtered ITO/Ag/ITO anodes.
Doug Krasucki, R.D. Specialties
After first being used in Germany in the 1880’s, Wire Wound Coating Rods were popularized by Charles Mayer. Mayer’s rods were first used for the manufacture of carbon paper and spread from there. This paper will answer the question: “Why use a 100 + year old coating Process”? The simple answer is that it delivers an accurate, smooth, repeatable coating and using it is relatively inexpensive.
This presentation will discuss: How the rod works; basic components and why they are chosen; different rod configurations and when they are used; various application configurations; wrap angle over the rod; web tension; range of coatings; coating head configuration; rod holders and drives; operating parameters; surface finishes available; and rod life.
Kristi Schmidt, Maxcess International Corporation
Vacuum rolls are a critical component used in the transporting of substrates that have been coated or can only be contacted on one side of the material. This paper will explore the inner workings of a vacuum roll, the various constructions, surface enhancements and design considerations. The paper will also discuss the various applications that utilize the tension isolation and web metering capabilities of the vacuum roll.
Christopher Mitchell, Innovia
A case study in collaborative film development leads to industry call to action
11:30 AM
Ajay Virkar, C3 Nano
C3nano’s solution coat-able transparent conductive materials will be discussed. Strategies and technologies for improving the overall optoelectronic properties of transparent conducting films for flexible displays and electronics will be described. Along with an introduction to C3nano’s product line and information related to the coating and converting, new developments related to ultra-thin hard-coats and protective coatings will be covered.
Dr. Edward Cohen, Edward D Cohen Consulting Services
The Web Coating & Drying Process generates a wide variety of defects that adversely effect product quality and costs; therefore eliminating them and preventing their reoccurrence is an essential requirement to insure a quality cost effective process. An important component of this defect reduction process is to recognize that there are some basic causes of defects and there are some unifying principles that control their formation and that each defect may not have a unique cause. . This is important, because defects that appear to be different in appearances can be different can result from result from the same basic fundamental cause. Therefore; eliminating a basic cause can result in reducing many different defects ands provide a more effect defect reduction process. The fundamental causes to be discussed are: • Contaminated Raw Materials • Substrate Deficiencies • Coating Solutions Are Not Optimized Or Reproducible • Unstable Coating Application • Inadequate Coating Line Support Equipment • Drying Induced Coating Distortions • Variations In Web Transport System Performance • Inadequate Operating Procedures And Training • Deterioration Of Coating Line Hardware Performance. • Key Process Variables Not Effectively Controlled
Steve Huff, Imperial Rubber
Roller geometry directly affects the way a web is handled through a machine. Common roll tolerances address roller diameter, taper and TIR. But what do these variations really mean to the end user? Most line operators and engineers have a general understanding of these properties but not how they affect their product let alone the proper way to measure these variations. A simple dial indicator cannot reveal the true concentricity of a roller. This paper will discuss roller geometry variation, its effects on web handling and new-to-the-industry techniques to determine the “real” values for these variations.
Rashi Tiwari, The DOW Chemical Company
PacXpert™ Packaging Technology is a patent-protected innovative technology that enables the transition from traditional rigid containers to flexible packaging. Some of the advantages include light-weighting, better shipping efficiency, maximum filled content utilization, large formats up to 20L possible. A fitment closure and dual handles allow for precision pouring, easy reclosing, and convenient carrying. Compared to the first examples*, several advances in the technology have enabled PacXpert™ Technology to have significantly improved performance. These advantages have enabled all the benefits of the PacXpert™ Technology flexible package to be translated to success in many more applications. PacXpert™ Technology utilizes Dow polymer and film technology for broad application usage, superior drop resistance and optimal stiffness/toughness balance. Once filled, the package is surface stable, so it can stand up or lay on its side. Additionally, the cube shape design also offers the ability to print on four sides and offer a see-through package. After opening, the package collapses easily to improve dispensing of contents, reduce excess head space, and reduce required storage space. The use of flexible materials in the package offers the benefit of reducing content waste by allowing the user to achieve a better yield of product from the package. PacXpert™ Technology can also help prolong the shelf life of air-sensitive products after opening – a win-win for cost-efficiency and sustainability.
12:00 PM

Lunch Sponsored by BASF

Location: Royal Palm

Sessions:

Process Sensitvities and Improvement

Session Leaders: Dante Ferrari, Celplast Metallized Products and Scott Jones, 3M

Advances in Coating and Lamination Technolgy

Session Leaders: Dr. Ken McCarthy, Clean Room Coating Solutions and John McGann, Henkel

Slitting and Splicing

Session Leaders: William Gilbert, Siemens and Steve Huff, Imperial Rubber

Food Safety and Preservation

Session Leader: Tom Dunn, FlexPacknology, LLC
1:30 PM
Wolfgang Decker, Hilberg & Partner
In an article in November of 2012 Dr. Charles Bishop in his Vacuum Coating Blog of Converting Quarterly lamented the lack of vacuum coaters utilizing inductively heated evaporation sources. He rightfully points out several advantages of such sources, including the possibility to evaporate a wide range of materials and to evaporate at higher temperatures compared to resistively heated sources. HP-MET from Hilberg & Partner, part of the newly formed HS-Group, is a brand new metallizer design utilizing inductively heated evaporation sources. A new design of the inductors as well as an advanced control system allow a high density of induction sources. The result is high speed, pinhole free deposition of metals and other materials. Comparative studies between resistively and inductively heated systems will look at deposition rates, morphology of deposited structures, pinhole counts as well as barrier and corrosion performance.

Bob Pasquale, New Era Converting Machinery
This presentation covers several different methods that exist for laminating multiple webs as well as how the process requirements determine which method is most suitable. It also covers several areas of consideration for the proper design of the laminating system including pressure and gap control of the lamination nip, construction of the laminating rolls, temperature control of the laminating rolls, driving of the laminating rolls and web handling into and out of the laminating section.
Prabhakar R. Pagilla, Oklahoma State University
A typical strategy during an unwind roll change operation includes the following sequence of events: (1) filling the festoon by over-speeding the expiring unwind roll; (2) decelerating the expiring roll to zero-speed; (3) cutting the web from the expiring roll and splicing the web from the new roll to the web in the festoon; and (4) accelerating the new roll to the desired line speed. Based on the particular strategy employed for the roll-change operation, the unwind roll (both expiring and new) is accelerated and/or decelerated several times. During these speed changes of the unwind roll, the festoon carriage also goes through a series of speed changes. Since inertias of rolls and mass of the festoon carriage are accelerated and decelerated during the roll change operation, there could be substantial variations in tension from the nominal reference value in the unwind section web spans including those in the festoon. Further, these tension variations could be propagated to downstream tension zones and may affect process performance. Based on line speed requirements and the capacity of the festoon, there are multiple ways to select the acceleration/deceleration profiles. In this paper, the key events surrounding the zero-speed splicing operation and acceleration and deceleration profiles of the unwind roll will be investigated to propose a strategy that can provide improved web tension regulation. The analysis will be based on the governing equations of web transport behavior (tension and speed) and the speed control system employed for the unwind roll. An unwind section of a web
Jim Huang, Bemis
Risk analysis is at the core of food safety. To improve risk analysis, the Society of the Plastics Industry convened a task force called Project Passport to streamline the communication through the supply chain from resin producers to the food processors.

2:00 PM
Pierre Fayet, Tetra Pak (Suisse) SA
Often during manufacture and usage of devices and systems protected by nanometer thin barrier layers, damages develop which compromises product performance and their life time. Designing systems by taking into account the mechanical properties of each constituent layers might help in making barrier coatings more resistant to multiple defects such as layer cracking, shear slippage and non-linear deformation of film substrates. Quantitative fragmentation testing together with suitable mechanical models will be presented for vacuum-deposited coatings (PECVD, reactive evaporation, ALD) on polymer films. The data can serve to numerical prediction of the final product performance.
Alexandre David and Gianni Zanatta, BOBST
The paper will be a technical description of the current status of the HM technology from a machine builder’s perspective. How HM coating machines are designed today, Evolution of the configuration of the slot die coating head for HM adhesives, Development of stripe coating for HM applications, Field observation and return of experience of Bobst.
Sean Craig, Maxcess
Sideforce, cant angle and blade profile all directly impact the most critical point in tangent shear slitting – the nip. This paper looks at all three in detail, showing how each one directly influences the other two, and provides guidelines for aligning all three to achieve optimal slit quality in a variety of real world applications.
Tom Dunn, FlexPacknology, LLC
"Packaging, while prohibited from adulterating food by legal constraints, is the forgotten food ingredient consumers and food processors. Packaging certainly is not cost–free so it must provide value by:

- containing products;
-protecting and preserving them;
-moving them from producer to users; and
-describing them throughout the supply chain

As part of the food supply chain packaging must not threaten the food it contains. All biological, physical, chemical risks resented by the packaging must be properly understood and mitigated.
Food safety management systems for food packaging manufacturing share many similarities with those for food processing operations. However those management systems must recognize key differences between the two manufacturing environments. In particular, commercial marketplace experiences demonstrate that the chemical hazards from food packaging manufacturing overshadow its biological hazards. Food safety management standards have only recently recognized that these differences in degree are critical, resulting in reluctant adoption of food management systems by food packaging manufacturers.
This presentation investigates the nature of these differences and suggests appropriate priorities for food management systems and training for food packaging manufacturing."
2:30 PM
Steve Jackson, Camvac
Transparent barrier coated films have been with us for many years now and probably before some our AIMCAL members joined our industry! So, here’s a brief walk through the history of vacuum deposited transparent barrier films, including the different technology options, early processing issues and some of the original barrier differences.

I’ll then move onto how the current process was improved and developed into the AlOx what we're producing today, inc performance criteria, specs, applications, problems and issues with a non-coated vacuum deposited AlOx.

I’d then like to discuss our research and development into in-chamber top coated AlOx systems, including the challenges along the development path, the performance advantages we see, the conversion differences between un-coated and some of the potential applications. I’ll also cover compliance issues. I’ll finish by updating on the changes and advancements made over the past 12 months.

In addition I’d like to cover the potentially explosive issue of handling aluminium oxide shale, which from a health & safety point of view, is an issue that should be taken seriously to avoid potential damage to person and property.
Guy Gil, Chase Machine and Engineering
Begin with an explanation of ultrasonic technology. Comparisons to other technologies. Ultrasonic friendly materials will be reviewed. End use products and their respective markets. Description of ultrasonic lamination. Pattern / anvil roll selection. The significance of machine construction. Examples will be provided as to how Ultrasonics is a superior joining method. Finally, existing slitting technologies with Ultrasonics being highlighted. Comparison photographs will be shared that clearly define the benefits of Ultrasonic slitting.
Dave Rumson, Slitting Consultant/Educator
The Shear Slitting process, by far, is capable of slitting the widest variety of flexible webs used in the paper and converting industries. Shear slitting, by far, is a much more complex process than both razor and crush cutting. There are at least eighteen (18 ) important geometric and dynamic factors relating to quality Shear Slitting.
Dr. Mitchell Cheeseman, Steptoe & Johnson LLP
Both US and EU authorities have recently been considering policy changes which may impact regulatory requirements for polymer masterbatches, particularly where food contact use is concerned. These changes may also impact the evolving regulatory systems in China and elsewhere in Asia. In addition, FDA’s food contact notification program is undergoing changes that may make innovation more challenging. This talk will cover current and anticipated challenges for producers and users of polymer masterbatches and advice on how to navigate the evolving regulatory frameworks for current and innovative products.
3:00 PM

Break Sponsored by BASF

Location: Royal Palm

Sessions:

Cathode and Substrate Heat Management

Session Leaders: Dante Ferrari, Celplast Metallized Products and Scott Jones, 3M

Advances in Coating and Lamination Technology (continued)

Session Leaders: Dr. Ken McCarthy, Clean Room Coating Solutions and John McGann, Henkel

Web Conveyence

Session Leaders: Duane Smith, Davis-Standard LLC and Clarence Klassen, KlassENgineering Inc

Food Safety and Preservation (continued)

Session Leader: Tom Dunn, Flex Packnology LLC
3:30 PM
Donald J. McClure, Acuity Consulting / Cedric Bedoya and Edward J. Anderson, 3M Corporate Research Laboratories
Reactive magnetron sputtering is an important process used for producing thin films of a wide range of metal compounds (oxides, nitrides and carbides) for applications including optical, dielectric, transparent conductive, protective, and barrier coatings. The principle is simple: start with a metallic target and add enough reactive gas (oxygen, nitrogen or carbon containing gas) to allow formation of the desired compound on the substrate. Unfortunately it is seldom that simple. A complexity arises because of the pronounced hysteresis observed while connecting our desired process outcomes to our traditional control variables. The hysteresis separates two distinct operating modes: the process space that enables the preferred deposited film chemistries; and the process space that enables the much higher rates possible with metal targets operated without reactive gas additions. There are many solutions to this difficulty, and, to be sure, this paper does not offer a new solution. Rather it describes measurements of a previously ignored variable that shows hysteresis: sputter cathode heating. The primary benefit of looking at the cathode heating hysteresis is a better understanding of the reactive sputtering process, including a determination of the ion-induced secondary electron emission coefficient at any operating point of the process. Additionally for select processes, especially for those operated close to the fully poisoned mode, monitoring the cathode heating hysteresis will allow an increase in the power delivered to the cathode, and thus an increase in rate, while still avoiding excessive heating of the cathode.
Thomas Bezigian, PLC Technologies
Recent advances in digital printing technology allow relatively wide-width webs to be printed at increasingly faster speeds with excellent quality onto many substrates, including oriented polyester films. These films are now being used as substrates for flexible packaging materials using conventional adhesive laminating equipment, modified slightly to accommodate the new ink technology. This paper will review the printing and adhesive laminating technology, exploring adhesives used as well as product performance and quality.
Jerry Brown, Essex Systems
It's very hard to get a precise answer to this question. The reason is not that vendors are secretive. The only honest answer is that, "It depends on lots of things and many of them are outside the control of the vendor." This paper provides insight into some of these factors and suggests ways to optimize results.
Dr. Michael Hogan, Applied DNA Sciences
"Supply chains for branded products and packaging, whether it be for food, pharmaceuticals or agrochemicals, are complex. The potential for products or packaging to be adulterated with inferior cheaper substitutes, is a concern. Every one that is part of the supply chain is affected when products are challenged by counterfeiting. Therefore, it is imperative to Know Your Supply Chain.
Although DNA is well-known as a molecular tag that can be used to identify human beings (as in crime scene forensics) or to identify animals and plants (as in DNA based ecological research), it is not yet widely-known that DNA can also be used to tag and to identify industrial commodities, such as cotton, wool, polyester or other synthetics.
The presentation will talk about some of the innovative solutions available today to protect products and packaging as they traverse the globe, and provide case studies where DNA technology can help protect products from the source to finished goods."

4:00 PM
Patrick Morse, Sputtering Components
The thermal budget for web based polymer substrates is a critical parameter to consider whenever depositing sputtered thin films. Electron heating and bombardment of high energy particles are commonly thought to be the primary source of substrate heating in a rotary magnetron sputtering process. The rate of energy transfer between the target and substrate as a function of plasma impedance is explored using a remotely adjustable magnet bar to control the positions of the magnets relative to the target surface.
Steve Zagar, B&W Megtec
In production of web-based advanced materials, the drying behavior of coatings, saturants, and various thin-layer microstructures represents a critical processing step. The practical rate of drying under production-scale methods available is often limited owing to various physical constraints, many of which are not apparent from early lab experiments and not characterized a priori in drying models. Qualitative identification and quantitative assessment of such constraints from data generated in bench-scale tests is explored and discussed.

Kevin Cole, Optimation Technology Incorporated
Roller conveyance deals with transporting a continuous web over rollers. Successful roller conveyance is achieved when this process does not damage the web. One defect that can be caused by an improperly designed or malfunctioning roller conveyance system is the formation of intermittent scratches. The purpose of this paper is to develop and present simple equations relating roller velocity and wrap angle in terms of scratch length, scratch pitch and web speed. It will be shown how the equations can be used to diagnose potential roller candidates that might be possible sources of scratches. In addition, troubleshooting guidelines will be outlined for the systematic elimination of scratches.
Dr. Cynthia Ebner, Sealed Air Corporation
Active Packaging and Intelligent Packaging have been ranked by Smithers Pira among the top ten most important technologies which are expected to significantly impact the flexible packaging industry over the next ten years. This presentation will discuss a variety of active packaging technologies engineered to extend product shelf-life, protect color and reduce confinement odors, e.g., oxygen scavenging, active barrier, odor scavenging and microbial control

4:30 PM
Holger Proehl, VON ARDENNE GmbH
Productivity of sputter roll coaters is limited due to the thermal sensitivity of the plastic substrate material: Generally rotary magnetrons achieve much higher deposition rates, compared to planars due to higher operating powers enabled by the better, direct cooling of the target material. Also the process stability is much improved, especially the arcing behaviour is less pronounced due to smaller redeposition zones on the sputter targets. Nevertheless, the thermal impact onto the web-substrate sets the limit. Here, other approaches have to be found. We will show here, how we can achieve up to three times of the usual deposition rates in reactive sputtering with intelligent process control, with the same magnetron power. Another way to reduce heat impact is the powering of the plasma discharge: When going from AC to DC, a further reduction of heat load is possible - and this even in reactive sputtering, when an appropriate anode cleaning can be guaranteed, e.g. with the DAS® method.
Anand Sundararaman, Jindal Films
Plain coextruded (coex) films are widely used in packaging and labels industries. However there are limitations to coextruded films in certain applications. Many of these limitations can be addressed by applying a suitable coating on the coextruded film. This paper will address different type of coatings that are applied on BOPP films and the typical property enhancements achieved through this coating step. This paper will also illustrate certain recent advances in printable and barrier coatings.
Dr. David Roisum, Finishing Technologies, Inc.
In research it is typical that only one source of stresses is studied at a time.  In entry-level mechanics textbooks, you may see the occasional combined stresses taught where a couple of sources are superposed.  Yet, seldom do webs experience only a single significant source of stress.  Indeed, most webs in the open web span see two or three sources; any or all of which could be significant.  More stresses are added when going over a roller.  This paper uses superposition to combine stresses commonly found in web handling including the not-so-‘simple’ web tensioning due to drive systems, bending due to in-plane roller misalignment and bending due to the radius of curvature of a roller.  Bending over rollers has become much more important in recent years with thicker materials, such as electronics made as webs, and with more brittle chemistries, such as about half of all vacuum deposition materials.  We also consider residual stresses of manufacturing such as bagginess and curl.  Finally, we combine all stresses appropriately and use a safety factor to observe how far from yield the most stressed portion of the web is.  This safety factor can serve as a proxy to estimate process reliability with regard to tensile failure of the web due to handling.
Guojun Zhang, A. Schulman, Inc.
Ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and Polyethylene (PE) with different weight fractions are pre-compounded and then extruded to fabricate thin films. Due to the appropriate compatibility/incompatibility and viscosity match between these two components, a morphology that is similar to layered structure arises in certain compositions without using any compatiblizer. Different numbers of multipliers are also utilized to further tailor the morphology of the extruded films with such compositions. As the number of multipliers increases, the compound film morphology gradually transforms from an elongated and layer-like structure to homogeneous mixture feature. This is because the melt is split and recombined by every sequence of multiplication. The morphology-property relationships of these EVOH-PE compound films are systematically studied by different analytical methods, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) OTR/WVTR Mocon units, mechanical tensile stretcher (MTS) etc.al. It is discovered that, with proper processing and desired morphology, the compound films of EVOH and PE show excellent properties for packaging applications.
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Vendor Session

Location: Vista Ballroom
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Reception and TableTops Exhibition Sponsored by DOW

Location: Royal Palm

Tuesday October 27, 2015

6:00 AM

Bernard Henry 5K Fun Run

Location: Meet in Hotel Lobby
7:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Registration Table

Location: Royal Palms Foyer
7:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast Sponsored by Unimin

Location: Royal Palm

Tracks:

Vacuum Coating
Location: Orchid 1

Web Coating
Location: Orchid 2

Web Handling
Location: Acacia 1-3

FlexPackCon
Location: Orchid 3-4

Sessions:

Process improvements

Session Leaders: Nick Copeland, Bobst Group and Patrick Morse, Sputtering Components

Adhesives Technology

Session Leaders: Joe Heinemann, Rayven Inc. and David Telep, Honeywell

Winding and More

Session Leader: Ken Guhse, Honeywell and Dr. Kelly Robinson, Electrostatic Answers, LLC

Our Evolving Industry: Merger and Acquisition

Session Leader: Chris Kerscher, A. Schulman, Inc.
8:30 AM
Dr. Sang-Jin Lee, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology
In this study, we introduce database of materials property such as ITO thin films with various Sn concentration and barrier thin film with thickness variation. We have studied physical properties of ITO thin films with Sn concentration of 3, 5, 7.5, 10% and make a simple program to search physical properties such as sheet resistance, optical transmittance, b* haze and so on. And we have also studied barrier properties of SiO2, SiNx thin films and multilayer film with thickness of 50, 100, 150, 200nm. Bending properties was examined to verify optimum thickness to maximize barrier performance. With the database of thin film materials using pilot scale roll to roll sputter, we could present the simple way to overview the various properties of thin films.
Mai Chen, DOW Chemical Company
Barrier property is essential for many flexible packaging applications. Foil, metalized film and other high barrier substrates are widely used to achieve high barrier properties. This presentation is about a new laminating adhesive technology which functions as laminating adhesive as well as barrier layer. This technology can provide and enhance the barrier property of lamination. Basic chemistry, barrier mechanism, application conditions and barrier properties will be discussed in this presentation.

Neal Michal, Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Wound rolls are everywhere in web manufacturing and converting processes. There are two categories of wound roll structures depending on material type. The resulting shape of the stored stress/strain relationship will change your material properties thru roll and over time. This paper will present practical methods to document which wound roll structure you have, how it impacts your material properties and what can be done to improve the delivered quality your customer receives.
Raj Krishnaswamy, Braskem America
This presentation will provide some perspectives, with examples, on the importance of innovation to the polymers industry. The primary intent of this talk is to initiate debate on innovation and to encourage collaborations within the industry. Specific topics to be covered include: (1) classification of innovation; (2) innovation at the intersection of different disciplines; (3) innovation through partnerships; (4) open source innovation; (5) challenges faced by the innovation community in the polymers industry. The examples that will be discussed include organizational, technical and behavioral components of innovation.
9:00 AM
Jongkoo Jeong, Higashiyama Film
Coating Testbed was opened at Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology with support from the Ministry of Knowledge Economy in 2011. It is equipped with three types of roll-to-roll coaters at a pilot scale, ie, wet coater, sputter and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coater. In addition to pilot scale coaters, there are also lab-scale coaters, film testing apparatus, rheometers and permeability testers. We have worked to develop functional films with the desirable optical, electrical conducting and barrier properties for touch screen panels and displays with several companies. We will present the results on the functional films such as Ag nanowire coated films and barrier films converted by R2R wet coater and CVD, respectively, with focusing especially on the effects of types of materials and processing conditions. We obtained transparent conducting films with low surface resistivity of a few ?/? and high light transmittance using Ag nanowires, and films with high barrier properties to water vapor less than 10-3 g/day/m2 for a single layer coated film by R2R CVD.
Natalie Ganio, Henkel Corporation
Ultraviolet curable hot melt pressure sensitive adhesives (UV HMPSAs) are becoming more attractive to the coater-converter as a next generation alternative to solvent acrylics. With improved drying and efficient curing processes, UV HMPSAs provide smaller physical and environmental footprints. This work specifically discusses a UV HMPSA utilizing cationic cure technology. While UV HMPSAs generally have the added benefits of a 100% solids formulation with no VOCs or solvent storage, the cationic cure mechanism also allows for higher coating speeds and a much lower UV dose to initiate cure.

Kevin Cole, Optimation Technology Incorporated
During thin film winding, rolls will sometimes form uniform width machine direction (MD) buckles. Commonly referred to as tin-canning defects, they may form across the entire width of the roll or appear in local widthwise bands. Tin-canning defects may also vary in intensity or breadth by location across the roll circumference or by radial position in the roll. Severity of the defect is also known to be a function of time within the wound roll. In order to develop an improved understanding of this defect, a study of nipped center winding was undertaken. The formation of tin-canning defects as a function of tension, nip load, nip roller design and pre-wind spreading was studied. This paper summarizes results from this work and discusses process options for reducing or eliminating this defect.
Rick Weil, Mesirow Financial
"Over the course of the last several years, the mergers and acquisitions (M&A) marketplace for specialty
plastics and packaging companies has been very active and robust. This discussion with highlight and
describe many of the activities of select key players. Private equity firms, corporates and entrepreneurs
have all played a significant role in the evolution of the deal market. In addition, I will cover some
specifics of current market conditions including:
? The market imbalances between acquirers and sellers;
? Financing availability and cost
? The rise and important role of private equity
? The impact of the hot stock market performance on M&A activity"

9:30 AM
Dr. Ron Lubianez, Heraeus Precious Metals
Continuous progress in conductivity, cost, and versatility as well as the tailored structuring process yielding invisible patterns makes Heraeus PEDOT-based conductive polymers the best choice for transparent electrodes for the future touch screen market. Touch screens based on Clevios™ have been commercialized. Heraeus will continue to develop Clevios™ further towards the needs of the touch screen applications.
Cindy Fruth, Ashland
Digital printing is an emerging technology in the label and packaging markets, with early success in the food and beverage sector. Understanding the interaction of the components selected for a digitally printed package is essential to the integrity of the structure and fitness for use. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate testing criteria used for evaluating various laminating adhesive technologies used on digitally printed packages.
Dr. David Roisum, Finishing Technologies, Inc.
Until recently, web handling information and particularly calculations were almost exclusively limited to those who had access to or owned rare paper manuscripts such as articles, books, columns in magazines, conference papers, seminar notes and the like. Finding the information was a challenge, getting information was a challenge and reading the information required a serious commitment. Worse yet, actually applying the information required specialized training, usually a degree in engineering, and much more time than almost anyone could afford. This left the treasure chests of web handling sunken beneath the sea of 'too busy to bother with.' AbbottApps changed all of that. With internet applications, we can do searches of literature better than anything web-handling experts, trained librarians or Google could do. All it requires is a smart device and two thumbs. With internet applications, we can do troubleshooting of a wide variety of problems, including the number one problem in the web handling industries; wrinkling. All it requires is a smart device and two thumbs. With internet applications, we can all do a variety of simple and heavy duty web handling calculations. All it requires is a smart device and two thumbs. No degree in engineering is required. Operators who understand a few basic technical terms and concepts can do sizing of rollers and calculate the required precisions of roller alignment as just two examples. The world have moved into a new place where, for the first time ever, the science of web-handling is instantly available to any and all of us who have two thumbs. AbbottApps are better than merely good. They are good, fast and cheap (in fact, free).
Panel Discussion:Jeffery M Williams, Rick Weil, Dan Florian, Brian McGee, Coveris, Mesiro Financial, Sun Capital, et al.
Panel discussion with Sun Capital, Mesirow Financial, and Covaris. Learn and discuss role of Private Equity in our industry.



10:00 AM

Break Sponsored by Unimin

Location: Royal Palm
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Marla Donahue, Flexible Packaging Association
The U.S. Flexible Packaging Industry represents $30 Billion in annual sales in the U.S. It is the second largest segment of the packaging industry and the fastest growing segment. Ms. Donahue will provide an overview of the industry including external challenges, brand owners preferences and expectations, and other current trends and drivers. The continuing shift from rigid to flexible packaging has underwritten significant growth in capacity and technology development. Mergers and acquisitions are having an impact on the industry structure. These changes and growth will be the subject of Ms. Donahue’s presentation.
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location: Meet in Lobby
Enjoy a one-of-a-kind sightseeing cruise where friendly and knowledgeable staff will provide interesting stories and historical insight about the beautiful homes, the waterways of Naples Bay, and Gordon Pass. As a guest on the M/V Double Sunshine sightseeing cruise you can relax, sip on a refreshing beverage, check out the beautiful mansions and take in the amazing sights that Naples Bay and Port Royal have to offer. If you’re lucky, you’ll even be able to enjoy the occasional dolphins frolicking alongside the boat. Transportation is provided and will pick-up guests at 1:00pm in the hotel lobby. The price is $60 per participant.
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: Meet in the Hotel Lobby for Carpooling to Course
Join fellow attendees for a scramble golf tournament at Naples Grande Golf Club. Teams will be randomly selected. Golfers will carpool to the course. Box lunch will be provided. For more details about the the course, visit the Naples Grande Golf Club Website. For course and club rental prices, see the Conference Pricing page.
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location: Acacia 1-3
Get together with fellow attendees in honor and memory of John Reading from 7:00 - 8:00 pm. Learn the origins of whisky and the different regions where they are produced, from Ricky Crawford, friend and colleague of John from The Scotch Malt Whisky Society of America. Learn the process of malting, fermentation, distillation and blending. Learn why the casks are an integral part of the Scotch. Participation is $35 per individual and proceeds will be donated to the Bernard Henry Scholarship Fund.

Wednesday October, 28 2015

7:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast Sponsored by Addivant

Location: Vista Ballroom

Tracks:

Vacuum Coating
Location: Orchid 1

Web Coating
Location: Orchid 2

Extrusion Coating
Location: Acacia 1-3

FlexPackCon
Location: Orchid 3-4

Sessions:

Flexible Packaging & Barrier

Session Leaders: Don McClure, Acuity Consulting and Training and Dr. Anye Chifen, LEYBOLD OPTICS GmbH

Flexible Electronics

Session Leaders: Mark Fehlmann, Madico, Inc. and Anand Sundararaman, Jindal Films

Extrusion Coating Basics

Session Leader: Jim Cooper, Dow

Processing Equipment and Materials

Session Leader: Dan Falla, NOVA Chemicals
8:30 AM
David Kessler & Bill Barlow, Printpack
What are consumer trends? We can talk about them through general tendencies, but we know that they are not constant, and they continue to vary by generation. Flipping the perspective from a manufacturing standpoint to the consumer mindset, this presentation addresses the importance of understanding how end users interact with packaging through a “sensory experience”, not only at the point of sale but also after the purchase. Macro consumer trends in the marketplace will be identified, and the application of these trends to packaging style and design will also be explored. Several current and emerging consumer trends will be highlighted, such as On-the-Go, Total Wellness, Responsible Consumption, etc. that continue to drive purchasing decisions and also demonstrate how packaging design has and can further capitalize on these trends.
Scott Pollard, Corning
As electronic devices become lighter, thinner, and more flexible, the substrate choice continues to be critical to their overall optimization. With their inherent benefits such as surface quality, optical transmission, hermeticity, and thermal and dimensional stability; glass substrates enable high-quality and long-life devices. This paper provides an overview of flexible glass substrates and how they enable high quality printed electronic devices with specific focus on demonstrations of R2R gravure-offset printing of <20mm linewidth features.
Corey Reardon, AWA
In 2015 AWA Alexander Watson Associates has completed the in depth research, analysis, and publication of its Industry Market Studies for Metallizing and Vacuum Coated Materials, and Extrusion Coated Papers and Boards. These two highly specialised material categories are key substrates used in packaging markets, as well as other technical and specialty applications. The research and findings by AWA in these studies have been utilised and reference by leading companies worldwide, and for years have been the expert source on market sizing, segmentation, growth and development trends.
Barry Hunter, DR. Collin
Material developers have many ideas, but investigating these ideas is very important. The developer needs to know if the idea is feasible, and if there is demand in the marketplace. A small R&D line can answer many of these questions and can help expedite production. Pilot scale production can test many concepts quickly, saving time, money and material waste.


9:00 AM
David Kessler & William J. Barlow, Printpack
What are consumer trends? We can talk about them through general tendencies, but we know that they are not constant, and they continue to vary by generation. Flipping the perspective from a manufacturing standpoint to the consumer mindset, this presentation addresses the importance of understanding how end users interact with packaging through a “sensory experience”, not only at the point of sale but also after the purchase. Macro consumer trends in the marketplace will be identified, and the application of these trends to packaging style and design will also be explored. Several current and emerging consumer trends will be highlighted, such as On-the-Go, Total Wellness, Responsible Consumption, etc. that continue to drive purchasing decisions and also demonstrate how packaging design has and can further capitalize on these trends.
Mark Poliks, Systems Science and Industrial Engineering
Flexible glass is one of the most promising innovations in the 21st century. Its applications in roll-to-roll (R2R) based manufacturing can yield low cost, flexible, conformable, and transparent electronics. In this work, we introduce electronic substrates consisting of subtractive single micron metal interposers, transparent antennas and high performance IGZO thin film transistors fabricated on Corning® Willow® Glass. All devices are fabricated with methods that are compatible with R2R fabrication including: vacuum deposition, photolithography, wet and dry processing.
Tom Bezigian, PLC Technologies
Recent advances in digital printing technology allow relatively wide-width webs to be printed at increasingly faster speeds with excellent quality onto many substrates, including oriented polyester films. These films are now being used as substrates for flexible packaging materials using conventional adhesive laminating equipment, modified slightly to accommodate the new ink technology. This paper will review the printing and adhesive laminating technology, exploring adhesives used as well as product performance and quality.
Steve DeSpain, Reifenhauser Incorporated
In recent years, as printing and converting equipment speeds and technology has increased the demand for flatter film has increased as well. Flatter blown film is more than simply controlling the thickness profile of the film as there are geometric forces happening inherently in the collapsing process that effect this. This paper will discuss the advances and improvements made to the blown film extrusion process in order to produce flatter film and the tests that were used to provide empirical data to confirm the flatness of the film with and without these improvements.
9:30 AM
Dr. Stella M. Van Eek, FHR Anlagenbau GmbH
Our task is to supply equipment and sputter-targets for broadly vacuum-coating. This experience enables us to integrate tool and materials in order to develop a robust process for the industrial manufacturing of thin films.
As an example we show here a Roll to Roll tool for coating of low emissivity (low-E) filters on flexible PET.
A combination of metal and oxide double and triple layers was developed to reflect non desired infrared thermal radiation while maintaining the transmittance in the visible range.
The in-situ metrology results will be discussed and compared with ex-situ measurements.
James Watkins, University of Massachusetts
Solution-based and roll-to-roll (R2R) technologies offer the potential for continuous and cost-efficient production but their applications in manufacturing of nanostructured devices have remained extremely challenging. We outline a strategy for electronic and optical device fabrication that includes self-assembly of well-ordered polymer/nanoparticle hybrids and R2R nanoimprint lithography using novel materials sets that enable the direct fabrication of patterned functional device layers. These include highly filled nanoparticle/polymer hybrids for applications that require tailored dielectric constant or refractive index and a new process that allows direct printing of patterned crystalline metal oxide films and composites with feature sizes of less than 100 nm. This approach is an attractive alternative to conventional subtractive processing using Si wafer-based platforms and can enable large area production of fully printed devices. Each of these methods can be scaled in our newly constructed R2R process and demonstration facility. Applications in flexible electronics, light and energy management, lighting, and sensors and will be discussed.
Frank Orsini, Davis-Standard, LLC
Presentation will be a practical explanation of the Extrusion coating process will highlighting the basic components, function of each, expected results, and performance parameters.


David Beddus, Windmoeller & Hoelscher Corporation
In recent years, the high cost of lost and damaged product has caused a change in the larger sized packaging for pet-foods, building materials, powders and chemicals.
This discussion examines how paper sacks are being replaced by stronger, moisture resistant packages made from plastic film and from laminated woven-PP fabric.
The various package technologies and related production equipment are reviewed in some detail.


10:00 AM

Break Sponsored by Addivant

Location: Orchid Foyer

Sessions:

Flexible Packaging & Barrier (continued)

Session Leaders: Don McClure, Acuity Consulting and Training and Dr. Anye Chifen, LEYBOLD OPTICS GmbH

Flexible Electronic (continued)

Session Leaders: Mark Fehlmann, Madico, Inc. and Anand Sundararaman, Jindal Films

Advances in Extrusion Coating

Session Leader: Tom Bezigian, PLC Technologies Extrusion Consulting Group

Processing Equipment and Materials (continued)

Session Leader: Dan Falla, NOVA Chemicals
10:30 AM
Sami Sneck, Beneq
Roll-to-roll ALD is an emerging thin-film coating technology for producing dense, conformal and pinhole-free coatings. Today, ultra-thin oxide layers produced by R2R ALD are piloted for ultra-barrier application to meet the stringent needs of emerging QD, PV, and OLED markets. This paper reviews the status of these 500 mm wide pilot systems for ultra-barrier, and provides an outlook on the capabilities, scalability, and possible new applications.
Scott Gordon, DuPont Teijin Films
Polyester film substrates have been widely used in making relatively simple membrane touch switches and other flexible / printed electronic devices for over 30 years, yet since the early 2000’s there has been an ever increasing desire to use “additive” printed electronics to replace “subtractive” etched circuitry in more complex, high performance, high value products. The ability to use flexible substrates in Roll-to-Roll production provides even more incentives for creativity within the plastic films, film processing, and coating industries. This next generation of Flexible Electronics technologies has required materials suppliers to deliver improved functionality to the device developers in fields as wide as electrophoretic displays, backplanes, barrier films, photovoltaics, sensors etc. This presentation will update the audience with the latest polyester film developments for Flexible Electronics
Christine Ronaghan, Cloeren
This discussion will review existing and new technologies in feedblock and die design as they apply to extrusion coating. Examples of how those technologies can be employed to optimize the extrusion coating process will be provided.
Eldridge M. Mount III, EMMOUNT Technologies
During the formation of cavitated films the cavitating agent needs to be completely dispersed and controlled in the average particle size. When producing cavitated films with mineral based cavitating agents this is done with particle size reduction and dispersive mixing. However, when incompatible polymer blends are used, the size of the dispersed phase will impact the quality of the final film and needs to be controlled. Control of the domain size is possible with proper selection of the individual polymers melt viscosity. The relative compatibility of the pair, in combination with the processing conditions, combine to control the domain size of the dispersed phase. Correlations between the dispersed domain size and the capillary number can be developed.

11:00 AM
Bryan Danforth, Lotus Applied Technology
Conventional pulse-based Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) has been widely shown to produce extremely high quality single layer barrier films, though generally at low deposition rates. Recent advancements in Spatial ALD have shown that films as thin as 3 nm, produced at web speeds in the range of a few meters per second can achieve barrier qualities suitable for high performance commercial packaging, at a cost that is competitive with incumbent technologies in the industry. However, films deposited at higher speeds have required greater thickness for a given barrier performance. In this paper we examine the individual components of the ALD cycle to determine impediments to achieving equivalent performance at web speeds up to 10 meters per second.
Don Novotny, Intrinsiq Materials
The ability to apply thinner copper coatings on flexible PCB substrates than are currently available in today’s high volume electronics industry will allow for much finer etch resolution and increased circuit density. The roll-to-roll lamination process in use today limits the copper foil thickness due to manufacturing and handing ultra-thin copper. Deposition by PVD requires expensive equipment. A solution-coating process eliminates these problems. A nanocopper-based electronic Ink and associated process has been developed to create ultra thin copper on flexible PCB substrates. We will describe how nanomaterial is created, dispersed, coated, and sintered resulting in copper foil of 1 micron or less. The process is rapid and sufficiently low temperature to allow deposition onto temperature-sensitive substrates such as polyimide, plastic and paper. We will show that the resulting foil can be etched and processed as well as electro-plated or electrolessly-plated without the use of palladium.
Christopher Walker, ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Polypropylene-based elastomeric resins for extrusion coating

Ron Becker, Addivant
Polymer producers are able to fine tune the resins that they manufacture today by using a combination of process control and catalyst technology to yield resins that will result in a film with properties that are required by convertors and eventually the consumer. One of the common features of all polyolefin resins used in packaging film applications is the need for a suitable stabilization system. Specifically, antioxidants are an integral part with regards to protection and performance of a polymer, without antioxidants any polyethylene will degrade when exposed to heat and oxygen through the polymers life cycle. The current demands from polyethylene resins including the new metallocene catalyst types, coupled with advances in processing equipment make control of color & gels critical to resin convertors of flexible packaging to insure that the films will maintain the needed aesthetics and shelf life for the final use, the correct stabilization system is critical. Global Regulatory requirements for additives used in food packaging are changing and becoming more demanding which is driving the need for new and clean antioxidants. Current stabilizing systems have difficulty in meeting these requirements. This paper will give a high level overview of the basics of stabilizing a LLDPE resin and introduce the new, clean WESTON® 705, a secondary antioxidant, which will allows flexible packaging industry to overcome the challenges outline above.


11:30 AM
Fabiano Rimediotti, Nordmeccanica Vacuum Division
This paper describes possible ways to produce vacuum metallized film with high barrier properties . The main focus will be on producing films which can withstand converting processes without affecting the properties. Barrier consistency represents, in fact, an even greater challenge since when the industry has been trying to use clear barrier metal oxide coatings, characterized by being more brittle and thus, more prone to spoilage, than the traditional aluminium vacuum coated films.
Bobby Greiner, Sensory Analytics
Thin coated films and coatings are being extensively used within the manufacturing process for flexible electronics and other transparent conductors. The proper application of coated layers plays a critical role in the performance of coated products with flexible substrates including films and foils. Increasing product performance requirements have created stronger demand for more flexible and accurate coating process control and measurement methods. The presented measurement method is a non-contact, non-radioactive, non-destructive and intrinsically safe means to improve and quantify the coating process for roll-to-roll application of both wet and dry coatings with nanometric precision. Presented thickness measurement data will include varied applied coating applications including multi-layer packages, barrier coatings, bio-compatible coatings, parylene coatings on circuit boards, optical enhancement coatings for display screens, bonding adhesives for laminates and transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coatings and patterned coatings for use with flexible circuitry.
Bruce Foster, Poly Knows
This paper reviews research on materials and operations designed to improve sustainability in the extrusion coating industry. Included are studies with raw materials based on renewable resources and that are biodegradable or compostable as well as case studies of converters' measures to improve sustainability through operations and package design.

Bradley Kramer, ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Five-layer polyolefin-dedicated film structures allow film producers to take advantage of the synergistic impact of equipment advances and application technology. This presentation discusses benefits that are made possible when using five-layer polyolefin-dedicated blown film technology. The benefits highlighted include extending current capabilities of 3-layer films, downgauging, and expanding design options.



12:00 PM

Lunch Sponsored by ExxonMobil Chemicals

Location: Vista Ballroom

Tracks:

Vacuum Coating
Location: Orchid 1

Web Coating
Location: Orchid 2

FlexPackCon
Location: Acacia 1-3

FlexPackCon
Location: Orchid 3-4

Sessions:

Flexible Packaging & Barrier (continued)

Session Leaders: Bill Barlow, Print Pack and Roland Trassl, AMAT

Solution Delivery Technology

Session Leaders: Doug Krasucki, R.D. Specialities and Dr. Kelly Robinson, Electrostatic Answers, LLC

Innovation Tools and Trends

Session Leader: Donna Davis, ExxonMobil Chemical Company

Package Performance and Sealing

Session Leader: David Constant, BASF Corporation
1:30 PM
Dr. Anye Chifen, Bühler Alzenau GmbH
"The trend will continue, consumers place increasing value in being able to see the product they are buying and in the freshness of the food at the time of purchase. Thus, improved (high barrier) results achieved for food packaging continues to be of crucial importance in order to extend the food shelf-life especially in real life situations, like food market, and house long-life use.
This is an update of the last report presented at AIMCAL in 2014 that presented the plasma assisted deposition (PAD) of aluminum oxide layers on various polymer films. This report focuses on the optimized barrier properties of biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films achieved in a roll-to-roll vacuum web coater production machine with respect to AlOx deposition vapor current, base film modification prior AlOx deposition, plasma pre-treatment and subsequent top coat material after AlOx deposition.
Additional to the achieved permeability properties measured using MOCON instruments, characterization results will be presented as obtained from surface & cross-sectional imaging (AFM & SEM ), element mapping (EDX) and surface energy. Based on the results obtained, our findings suggest less ageing of films, stability of the permeability, optical density, peel strength, layer uniformity as well as the surface energy as compared to the conventional reaction oxidation processes.

Eric Maki, B&W MEGTEC
Everyone wants their coating process to perform perfectly, but many of us only start to monitor the performance once we begin coating. By then, it may be too late. We need to start building our coating process performance with the raw materials that are put in to the product, as well as all of the upstream processes from material handling through mixing and fluid delivery. This paper will discuss the necessary steps to consider when optimizing a coating process.
Greg Stevens, WinOvations
"Innovation, the successful commercialization of inventions, is essential to the long-term profitability of the packaging business. But, how do you know if your packaging-related new business development NBD process is working? After all, it often takes five to ten years for substantially new products to become commercialized in most industries, including packaging.

To find out, first of all you need a benchmark showing what the odds of NBD success are for major corporations and venture capitalists. Only with a benchmark can you see if you are above average, average or below average, for any given stage of the NBD process from first idea to full commercialization. For example, from the “early development stage,” you may think that if just one in five concepts succeeds you’re doing poorly, when in reality your success rate is double the average. In this presentation, we’ll present such a benchmark developed by this author which is one of the most widely quoted “success curves”.

Having defined what the benchmark is for success, naturally the emphasis should be on raising your odds of success well above average, to help create a long-term competitive advantage for your packaging business.
"
Abdellah Ajji, PolyMTL
"During the last decades, the food, pharmaceutical and many other industries have seen several changes in packaging technology and applications because of new consumer demands and market trends. These drivers can be summarized as requirements for high quality, freshness and extended shelf-life of products, with easy-to-use and resistant packaging made with lighter, cheaper and recyclable materials. On the other hand, public demand and awareness for food safety has become a significant concern. This even intensifies on every outbreak of various bacteria in various area of the world, following the consumption of contaminated meat and cheese products. Those outbreaks prompted the public awareness to question food quality in stores and technological solutions that could prevent contamination and/or alert consumers, which may provide better public protection.
The performance of polymer films and multilayer packages are the result of the microstructure that is imparted to the material as a result of complex interactions between the resin and the thermo-mechanical history that it experiences during processing. This microstructure is strongly influenced by molecular parameters of the resins used (molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, branching, co-monomer type and content, etc.), their layout in multilayer structures and the additives used as well as the rheological, thermodynamic, thermal properties and the crystallization kinetics under the processing conditions. In the past, most of the studies were directed to the improvement of structural properties of films and multilayer structures (mainly mechanical: strength, tear, toughness etc…) and much less interest was directed to functionality such as barrier, porosity, antibacterial, antimicrobial, oxygen scavenging, detection, biological interactions etc. In this presentation, the results of recent studies directed towards addressing those concerns will be presented and discussed."
2:00 PM
Eldridge Mount, EMMOUNT Technologies
This paper will highlight the importance of maintaining both the pumping time and starting pressure standards for metallization and its use in determining the need for vacuum pump maintenance. Also the use of starting chamber pressure as a process control point for uniform barrier properties. One of the principal maintenance items on a vacuum metallizer is routine preventive maintenance on the high vacuum diffusion pumps. This is a big job and is usually scheduled at long fixed intervals. The question often arises as to when to shut down and perform diffusion-pump maintenance on a metallizing chamber whose pump performance has begun to degrade. In the daily drive to continue production, maintenance may be delayed. Meanwhile the product may seem "OK," i.e. you can obtain average optical density, and because the pump-down to starting pressure becomes too long, the tendency is to start a roll at a higher chamber pressure than normal to regain productivity. What’s the harm? After all, the OD is OK. Depending on the end use, it may not have gotten bad enough to create a finished-product failure. However, in many of today’s more sophisticated products, which rely on the development of gas barriers, the film’s properties might be significantly degraded.
Todd Arndorfer, Carestream Contract Manufacturing
Precision coating encompasses sophisticated, highly controlled functions, including distribution of liquid across a conveying web and control of coating thickness in the down-web direction. Uniform coatings require precise fluid metering, precision coating heads and tight conveyance tension controls. Thus, an operation’s capabilities are partially defined by the quality and accuracy of solution delivery systems. This presentation will detail the requirements for advanced solution delivery and provide advice for ensuring optimum product quality and cost control.
Paul Musille, NineSigma
Tools and best practices for innovation process and support


Dan Falla, NOVA Chemicals
Applications Most cereal and cracker packages are designed to have the seal layer peel apart while being opened. Unfortunately, opening these packages often results in catastrophic failure of the film and spillage of the contents. In this study, various types of peelable seal layers were investigated. In addition, a new high moisture barrier sHDPE was evaluated.
2:30 PM
Angelo Yializis, Sigma Technologies International
Metallized and clear metal oxide coatings used in applications such a food packaging, printing, decorative, biomedical, electronic and agricultural, often require certain surface functionality that alters the properties of the metallized surface. Useful functional properties include high surface energy for adhesion to printing inks and other materials, low surface energy for slippage and hydrophobic properties, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, barrier to moisture and oxygen, antibacterial and antifungal properties. Sigma has developed and patented several “dry” treatment, grafting and coating processes that can be implemented in a vacuum environment without the use of aqueous and organic solvents. These processes are economical, they require a fraction of the energy and real estate used by conventional grafting and coating technologies and they are environmentally friendly. A wide range of functional materials may be used many of which are FDA approved for food contact. The ability to do this at metallizing speeds and in in-line with the metallization process, adds value both to the equipment as well as the metallized product. For many applications, polymeric films, membranes, and various other web-based products, need to be functionalized without the application of a metallized layer. Such treatments and coatings often have higher value than metallizing, which transforms the metallizing machine to a versatile converting tool. Several examples of post metallization treatments, grafts and coatings are presented, as well as functional coatings on membranes, woven and non-woven materials processed in a roll-to-roll metallizer.
Dr. Ken McCarthy, Clean Room Coating Solutions
Many coating operations handle a wide variety of products, but prepare their coating solutions in a fixed set of equipment. This paper shows techniques that have been developed recently to estimate the “blend time,” that is, the time to achieve a given degree of uniformity in a mix tank. This discussion will focus on the most common mix situations in coating, namely blending of liquids and dispersion of solids in liquids, where the liquid viscosity is low to moderate, that is, less than 2000 cp. Often, standard mix processes are applied to a wide variety of mixes. Impeller size and rotational speed can affect the blend time, as can the baffle geometry. Knowledge and use of these techniques can optimize mix times, hence manpower requirements, and can optimize mix power requirements. Both of these parameters affect cost. Small changes in baffles can solve several mix issues, saving capital investment.
Dudley Brundige and Jason Pallente, GLG
"Leveraging external insight and expertise is a critical part of successful innovation. However, businesses are continually challenged with finding objective new perspectives and actionable information that can fuel decision-making on new technologies, products, partners, markets and investments. In addition to these gaps, there is mandate for teams to act faster, to make smarter bets, and to be more flexible.
Given this landscape, it is imperative that organizations implement an effective learning strategy to capture and accelerate knowledge acquisition. In recent years, many leading companies have adopted GLG’s tools to help address their innovation and learning challenges.
GLG’s presentation at FlexPackCon will focus on exploring case studies and insights on the following areas:
• Challenges that companies face today with understanding technologies and market opportunities.
• How an effective external insights toolset and strategy can help impact innovation.
• How flexible packaging and coatings companies are adopting the GLG platform to accelerate new product development processes and innovation pipeline development.
Leveraging external insight and expertise is a critical part of successful innovation. However, businesses are continually challenged with finding objective new perspectives and actionable information that can fuel decision-making on new technologies, products, partners, markets and investments. In addition to these gaps, there is mandate for teams to act faster, to make smarter bets, and to be more flexible.
Given this landscape, it is imperative that organizations implement an effective learning strategy to capture and accelerate knowledge acquisition. In recent years, many leading companies have adopted GLG’s tools to help address their innovation and learning challenges.
GLG’s presentation at FlexPackCon will focus on exploring case studies and insights on the following areas:
• Challenges that companies face today with understanding technologies and market opportunities.
• How an effective external insights toolset and strategy can help impact innovation.
• How flexible packaging and coatings companies are adopting the GLG platform to accelerate new product development processes and innovation pipeline development.
Leveraging external insight and expertise is a critical part of successful innovation. However, businesses are continually challenged with finding objective new perspectives and actionable information that can fuel decision-making on new technologies, products, partners, markets and investments. In addition to these gaps, there is mandate for teams to act faster, to make smarter bets, and to be more flexible.
Given this landscape, it is imperative that organizations implement an effective learning strategy to capture and accelerate knowledge acquisition. In recent years, many leading companies have adopted GLG’s tools to help address their innovation and learning challenges.
GLG’s presentation at FlexPackCon will focus on exploring case studies and insights on the following areas:
• Challenges that companies face today with understanding technologies and market opportunities.
• How an effective external insights toolset and strategy can help impact innovation.
• How flexible packaging and coatings companies are adopting the GLG platform to accelerate new product development processes and innovation pipeline development.
"


Having defined what the benchmark is for success, naturally the emphasis should be on raising your odds of success well above average, to help create a long-term competitive advantage for your packaging business.


Eddy Garcia-Meitin, The Dow Chemical Company
Polyolefins used in flexible food packaging play a key role in enhancing our everyday lives. Food packaging extends shelf life, protects products form physical damage and keeps bacteria out. The development and design of food packaging require that scientist and engineers understand material properties, structure and performance. Analytical tools such as optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopies play key roles in material analysis and development at Dow [1-3]. This paper provides an overview of how light microscopy (LM) techniques were used to evaluate heat seal performance such as hermeticity and hot tack in vertical form fill seal (VFFS) packages. Having the ability to correlate heat seal temperature with performance is helping accelerate development of differentiated resins for flexible VFFS packaging.


3:00 PM

Break Sponsored by ExxonMobil Chemicals

Location: Orchid Foyer

Sessions:

Magnetrons, Plasma and Control

Session Leaders: Bill Barlow, Print Pack and Roland Trassl, AMAT

Solution Delivery Technology (continued)

Session Leaders: Doug Krasucki, R.D. Specialities and Dr. Kelly Robinson, Electrostatic Answers, LLC

Innovation Tools and Trends (continued)

Session Leader: Donna Davis, ExxonMobil Chemical Company

Package Performance and Sealing (continued)

Session Leader: David Constant, BASF Corporation
3:30 PM
Wilmert De Bosscher, Soleras Advanced Coatings
Sputter coating of high quality layers and stacks on flexible polymer substrates is of growing interest for a wide portfolio of high-end applications. Realizing the desired combination of optical, electrical and mechanical layer properties while sustaining long term stable, uniform and high yield deposition processes puts stringent requirements on magnetron and target material quality. The rotatable magnetron technology and cylindrical target materials have evolved significantly and may offer unique capabilities for achieving these performance expectations.
James Feltman, Tacmina USA
Although there are literally endless variables that can affect coating quality, there are five key areas that are the main contributors to success or failure – the die or coating head, the positioning system, substrate uniformity, backing roll tolerance and the fluid delivery system. When it comes to the fluid delivery system, there can be complex combinations of components but the heart of the system is always the pump. Gear pumps, progressive cavity pumps, and pressure pots are generally the go-to devices for precision metering but some fluid chemistries push the threshold beyond the capabilities of these pumping technologies. For example, shear sensitive materials perform poorly with a gear pump; solvents may swell the rotor, stator or seals in a progressive cavity pump; and solid particles in suspension may abrade and damage the internal parts of both types of pumps. Modern, motor-driven diaphragm pumps may be the answer for these complex fluids. Current designs feature engineered combinations of chamber design, check valves, fluid routing, and cam profiling that provide accurate output of even the most difficult to transfer fluids with extremely low, almost non-existent pulsation. Diaphragm pumps are easy to maintain and clean. Most importantly, they perform where other pumps struggle or fail to meet the needs of the application. When searching for systems solutions for coating applications, make sure not to overlook the fluid delivery system and the capabilities provided by the pump technology. Consider (and evaluate) all types of pumps for your coating application.
Dr. Lora Liang, Mondelez International
This talk will focus on a disruptive innovation model of involving the strategically selected partners from the supply chain for flexible film packages. Will discuss innovate together as a community for win-win situations, and review case studies and how innovation came through under this concept.

Barry Morris, DuPont
Pinholes are often formed during filling of crackers and other sharp products during vertical form fill seal operations. Standard lab tests fail to predict the puncture resistance of packaging films. A high speed impact test for measuring puncture resistance of multilayer films was developed which shows good correlation with empirical drop tests. The test method is based on observations of puncture events using high speed photography. A numerical model of the puncture event is being developed. Initial model results on monolayer film agree well with the experimental results. The new test method and model will help determine what factors, such as layer composition, placement and thickness, most impact performance and lead to improved packaging films.

4:00 PM
Frank Papa, Gencoa Ltd
Web coating vacuum technology traditionally has offered a low cost, large production manufacturing process for coating of paper, plastic and fabric webs. Many emerging applications such as barriers, thin film photovoltaic cells on polymers and organic electronics increasingly rely on web coating technology for entering the market as a price competitive solution with good performance. One of the main requirements is the product consistency from the beginning to end of roll, from roll to roll and from country to country where the process is being run. The key aspect of the process is the substrate preparation for the application of the functional coating in order to eliminate large outgassing and improve the bond between the web and the coating. The present paper explores the use of state of the art plasma treaters and feedback process control to determine the right process parameters necessary to ensure good film adhesion and establish trouble-free long running campaigns.
Ken McCarthy, Clean Room Coating Solutions
In this presentation, we will look at three important aspects of dispensing systems, namely coater feed systems, bubbles, and filtration. For coater feed systems, we will focus on the ways to deliver coating solutions to the application area. Bubbles in dispensing systems are difficult to eliminate; sources will be discussed, as well as best methods to avoid or eliminate bubble. Filtration will be reviewed for some best practices. Finally, we will discuss a method to characterize filters.
Matthew Dingee, Campbell Company of Canada
Learn how a new Campbell’s product and package launch leveraged high barrier film to deliver consumer benefit and brand equity. As a result, see how packaging professionals across the industry can identify packaging opportunities and collectively convert into consumer value.
Rory Wolf, ITW Pillar Technologies
Surface modification for flexible packaging is a topic that has been the subject of many investigations by both academia and industry. However, relatively little attention has been devoted to the practical aspects of applying non-thermal corona and atmospheric plasma surface activation technologies which, when appropriately leveraged, cause flexible packaging materials to become highly receptive to varying formulations of inks, coatings, primers and adhesives. This paper will delineate ten key operating considerations based upon the latest state-of-knowledge which can ensure that these technologies are being optimized for the highest levels of adhesion, product quality and uptime.
4:30 PM
David J. Christie, Advanced Energy Industries
Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit large scale multi-layer structures on flexible webs for an expanding set of disruptive applications. Pulsed power is used for reactive deposition of dielectric and semiconducting compounds, enabling deposition processes essentially impossible with direct current (DC). Target arcs are prevented by periodic discharge of insulative films deposited on the target. Reversing anode voltage enables continuous processing. New developments, key solutions, and opportunities driven by pulsed power capabilities are presented.
Vince Miller, Emerson Process Management
Coriolis multi-variable flowmeters provide an effective cost control measure ensuring the consistency and quantity delivered are correct. These versatile flowmeters help avoid giving too much product away, or having product wastage. In many applications, the spray or coating must be of the right consistency to stick onto the target base material, and remain there. The spray flow rate must be controlled to deliver the correct volume of spray for the items being coated or flavored, which can vary greatly and depend on the conveyor speed. Coriolis meters provide solutions for all these challenges in both gas and liquid applications, the right solution for continuous automatic control now possible using one device, a Coriolis multi-variable flowmeter.
Innovation Panel Discussion
Industry experts from across the value chain will take audience questions. Discussion will focus on the innovation process and management tools
Robert Hammond, Mica Corporation
"Using the TIAG Equation (reference original paper) with the higher line speeds achieved by
today’s extrusion equipment, speeds are exceeding 1200 feet/min (fpm), and many are reaching
up to 2000 fpm, and beyond. The equation shows that insufficient oxidation is occurring at these
higher speeds. Even if the air gap could be achieved, the melt temperature would be far too low.
Many lines compensate for the large air gap by increasing the temperature. !
These higher temperatures start to degrade the polymer, by decomposition or crystallization; the
results are poor bonds, poor heat seal strengths and odor from the extrusion layer. Chemical
primers are necessary to achieve acceptable bond levels and seal strengths. Chemical primers
from polymer adhesion promoters and electrical discharge (ozone) can help develop the proper
oxidation necessary for adequate bonding between the substrate and the extrusion melt. !
The technique has been successfully used to create the necessary oxidation in the melt for the
thermal lamination film market for 40 years or more. Typically an EVA resin is used as a sealant
layer for the film. EVA when heated above 430oF starts to decompose and acetic acid is given
off. The EVA can no longer provide the performance required for the application. !
The industry has used ozone blanketing (give paper reference) of the melt curtain, at a lower
temperature (~ 425oF), and a polymer adhesion promoter to achieve the oxidation necessary for
the application performance, excellent heat seal strengths. The same mechanism can be used
on other polyolefin resins that already use temperature and TIAG to get sufficient oxidation. !
It is theoretically possible to lower melt temperatures and air gaps while still achieving the same
level of oxidation at speeds up to 900 fpm. It is also theoretically possible to keep melt
temperature long enough to have good seal-ability with line speeds exceeding the practical air
gap distance and higher temperatures that adversely affect bonding, odor and seal strengths. !
In this set of experiments we wish to qualitatively determine the extrusion parameters necessary
to maintain sufficient oxidation above 900 fpm, the practical limit of the TIAG equation; using
ozone and a polymer adhesion promotion coating."
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Farewell Reception Sponsored by Olbrich

Location: Mangrove Pool
AIMCAL

The world's web process community.
Join. Participate. Succeed.

USA Office

201 Springs Street
Fort Mill, SC, 29715
USA
Phone: 803-948-9470
Fax: 803-948-9471
Email: aimcal@aimcal.org

Europe Office

PO Box 69533
1060 CA Amsterdam
The Netherlands
Phone: 0031 (0)20 8208635
Fax: 0031 (0)20 8208634
Email: aimcal@aimcal.org

facebook link linkedin link youtube link twitter link instagran